Order the handbook.

 Home> Reader's Profile> Extension Workers

The following extracts from the handbook Technology of Indian Milk Products would be of interest to Extension Workers.

Section 1.1 - Modernization Opens Global Markets


Table 1.1.6 Value and volume of output of the organized dairy sector, 2001 (Pg 8)


Product
Volume
(in million tonnes)
Rate
(Rs '000/tonne)
Value
(Rs billion)

Liquid milk
6
12
72
Branded mithais
0.4
100
40
Branded ghee
0.15
110
16
Western products:
Milk powders*
0.35
80
28
Cheese
0.01
150
2
Ice cream (million litres)
150
50/litre
8
Butter
0.04
120
4
Total    
170 ($3.4 billion)

*Includes Baby Food, SMP, WMP, Dairy Whitener, etc.



Section 1.3: Dairy and Livestock Production Statistics

Table 1.3.4 Trends in India's annual milk production and its per capita availability, 1960-2010 (Pg 34)


Year
Milk production
Per capita availability
________________________
 
(million tonnes)
kg/year
grams/day

1960
20.0
45
124
1970
22.2
42
114
1980
31.6
47
128
1990
53.9
65
178
1995
66.2
72
197
1996
69.1
74
202
1997
71.9
76
207
1998
75.2
78
213
1999
78.1
78
214
2000
81.0
80
219
2001 (Estimated)
84.6
82
226
2005 (Projected)
98.30
89
243
2010 (Projected)
119.60
100
275

Source: Department of Animal Husbandry & Dairying, Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India.


Section 4.1: Production Planning and Implementation

Production Planning and Implementation (Pg 217 - 218)

The feasibility study is essential for implementation of such a project. It should cover capital investment on land, building, equipment, infrastructure, working capital, manufacturing and marketing cost, and financial projections to work out the viability of the project. Once its viability is established, a detailed project report should include the following ten steps for project planning and implementation:

First Step: Appoint a consultant to plan the project in relation to the proposed market, design the dairy plant, and select an architect and a structural consultant. Prepare tender documents for civil works and plant equipment.

Second Step: After quantifying the product mix, work out the process flow diagram showing the material balances.

Third Step:
Formulate dairy plant specifications. The proposed design should include:

  • Space required (Floor Area).
  • List the equipment, their specifications and capacities.
  • Prepare the plant layout, including process, service and storage.
  • Provide for service requirements…

Fourth Step: Prepare for plant construction by attending to the following:

  • Selection of the site;
  • Survey the availability of essential services like water, electricity, all-weather road, communications, etc; and,
  • Tender for civil works, equipment supply and installation, and the subsequent award of contracts.


Fifth Step: Formulate the marketing plans for design of brand name, logo, packaging, procurement of packaging and labelling materials. Appointment of core staff, including plant manager, administration and marketing personnel.

Sixth Step: Arrange for sanctions/approvals/clearances by the Central/State/local statutory authorities.

Seventh Step: Coordinate the civil construction work with the suppliers for timely installation of the dairy equipment and machinery.

Eighth Step: Complete the civil construction to the stage when equipment can be installed.

Ninth Step: Select and appoint supervisors and the operating staff. Erection, installation and commissioning of the plant and machinery.

Tenth Step: Place the products in the market through well-established marketing channels.

The techno-economic feasibility study is presented in four parts:
Part I: Investment opportunities;
Part II: Plan for product manufacturing;
Part III: Development of plant layout; and,
Part IV: Cleaning and sanitization.




Figure 4.1.6 Mass Balance for production of pasteurized/ultrapasteurized lassi
(Pg 242)




Investment Opportunities
(Pg 219)

A project for factory-scale production of traditional milk products becomes viable with the milk processing capacity of at least 20,000 litres per day (lpd).
For products manufacture, procurement of good quality raw milk in desired quantity should be assured. The milk collection has to be in tune with the products' manufacture schedule.

An integrated milk products plant should have a minimum milk handling capacity of 20,000 litres per day. It will entail a capital investment of about Rs 50 million. Its annual turnover would range between RS 150 and 200 million, depending on the product mix. The estimated capital investment on plant and equipment would be about RS 41 million and on the building RS 13 million, taking the total investment to RS 54 million. However, it could be brought down to RS 38 million or increased to RS 81 million, depending on the type of packaging machines installed in the plant, and whether it is an independent entity or extension of an existing liquid milk plant. For example, an imported cup-filling machine of capacity 2,400 to 3,000 cups/hour costs RS 7.5 million. On the other hand, a locally manufactured filling machine of capacity 1,500 cups/hour costs about RS 700,000. An imported form-fill-and-seal (FFS) machine costs around RS 36 million. Thus, the packaging machinery can alone cost as much as 50 per cent of the cost of the plant and equipment. Reconditioned machines are now allowed to be imported in the country and their cost could be less than 50 per cent of the cost of new machines.


Order the handbook. Have queries? Contact us.

E-mail: mail@indianmilkproducts.com




 A Wide Scope
The scope of this handbook extends to Food Engineering and Technology, Agriculture Economics & Statistics, Nutrition,
Agribusiness Entrepreneurship and Rural Technology.
   
Home | Contact Us | Go to the Top



Copyright © Dairy India Yearbook .  All rights reserved.

Site developed by Orient InfoSolutions